Author Archives: Sara

A Famous Fistula

The Spanish Ambassador to James I of England suffered from an anal fistula which was common knowledge. John Reynolds’ imagined conversation between the late King Henry, Queen Anne, and Queens Mary and Elizabeth in 1624 includes the comment that Count Gondomar had the permission of King James to spend the summer at Greenwich as the …

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Thomas Gibson’s Life and Times

The name of Dr Thomas Gibson (1648/9–1722) isn’t one with much impact outside those studying the history of medicine, yet his story is one full of interesting details. Gibson was born in High Knipe, in the parish of Bampton, Westmorland.1 This is near Penrith in modern-day Cumbria. Gibson’s ODNB entry and his obituary in the Munk’s Roll record that …

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Poking fun at Physicians

For another project I have been reading lots of early modern joke books and I thought I’d share some of what I’d found here. Books of amusing songs, poems, funny stories and jokes, known as jest-books sold a lot in the seventeenth century. These were not a new form, as Michael Mangan has pointed out, …

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Good to Meet You

This week, Early Modern Medicine’s contributing editor, Sara Read, chatted to The Guardian newspaper as part of their Good to Meet you series. The interview mentions her first monograph Menstruation and the Female Body in Early Modern England, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2013. To read more from this book, visit http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137355027 where a free preview …

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Anne Taylor’s Stones

This week’s post discusses the case of  20-year-old Anne Taylor, who worked as a servant to a brewer named Sikes, in Romford, Essex. Anne was treated by chemical physician George Thompson (1619-1676) in February 1655. We last met Thompson in this post. Thompson added an appendix to his 1665 book Galeno-pale: A Chymical Trial of the …

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