Author Archives: Jennifer

Jennifer is a Senior lecturer in History at the University of Hertfordshire. Her research focuses on gender, the body and medicine in early modern England. She has published in Social History of Medicine and Women's History Review. Her first book Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England was published in 2014 in the Royal Historical Society Studies in History Series

Preventing Pregnancy

Early modern historians have long discussed whether people in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries actively limited their family size. Dorothy McLaren has shown that women might extend the length of time for which they breastfed their babies in order to space pregnancies further apart, while Angus McLaren, Edward Shorter and others have explored in detail …

Read more

Maladies and Medicines

We are very pleased to announce that our new book – coming July 2017 – is now available to pre-order from a range of retail outlets! Maladies and Medicine: Exploring Health and Healing 1540-1740 (Pen and Sword Press) Maladies and Medicine: Exploring Health and Healing, 1540-1740 offers a lively exploration of health and medical cures in early …

Read more

Pancake Plasters

Yesterday, as I am sure everyone is well aware, was Shrove Tuesday. A day when Facebook and Twitter feeds abound with people posting picture of their perfect pancakes. Several historical twitter feeds shared images of early modern pancake recipes, so I don’t wish to do that here. The London Metropolitan Archives tweeted a recipe attributed …

Read more

Spare Ribs

During my PhD I had trouble with my arms. After speaking to a fantastically enthusiastic surgeon it was revealed that I have cervical ribs. An extra set of ribs growing out of my cervical spine (you can see my x-ray here). These spare ribs complicate the placement of my blood vessels and nerves. I have …

Read more

Calling for Back Up

Daniel Turner was born in London, probably, on 18 September 1667. When he grew up he served a two-year apprenticeship under London surgeon Charles Bateman, and a five-year apprenticeship with Thomas Lichfield. In 1691 he joined the Company of Barber Surgeons. In 1711 Turner moved from being a surgeon to be a physician; he became a …

Read more

%d bloggers like this: